In Unix, how do I use the scp command to securely transfer files between two computers?

Unlike rcp or FTP, scpencrypts both the file and any passwords exchanged so that anyone snooping on the network can’t view them.

Warning: Be careful when copying between hosts files that have the same names; you may accidently overwrite them.

The syntax for the scp command is:

scp [options] [[user@]host1:]filename1 … [[user@]host2:]filename2

[[user@]host1:]filename1 is the source file and path, and [[user@]host2:]filename2 is the destination.

For example, if user dvader is on a computer called empire.gov, and wants to copy a file called file1.txt to a directory called somedir in his account on a computer called deathstar.com, he would enter:

scp file1.txt dvader@deathstar.com:somedir

Likewise, if he wanted to copy the entire contents of the somedir directory on deathstar.com back to his empire.gov account, he would enter:

scp -r dvader@deathstar.com:somedir somedir

Similarly, if he is working on another computer, but wanted to copy a file called file1.txt from his home directory on empire.gov to a directory called somedir in his account on deathstar.com, he would enter:

scp dvader@empire.gov:file1.txt dvader@deathstar.com:somedir When using wildcards (e.g.,  *  and  ? ) to copy multiple files from a remote system, be sure to enclose the filenames in quotes. This is because the Unix shell, not the scp command, expands unquoted wildcards

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